Piepaliai Hill Fort

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Piepaliai village, Babtai, Kaunas district
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The Piepaliai Hill Fort is on the cape of the upper terrace of the right bank of the Nevėžis river. You’ll find this hill fort, which is also known as Babtynas, Babcinas and Žemaitkiemis, on your way to the Babtynas-Žemaitkiemis Manor, famous for its cultural events and located northeast of Piepaliai village.

The hill fort dates back to the period from the 1st millennium to the beginning of the 2nd millennium and is classified as an Iron Age monument. In 1880, the hill fort was mentioned in the Dictionary of Geography, published in Warsaw.

Climb 15 metres to the top of the small hill fort and you’ll find a triangular platform with a length of 17 metres and a width of 24 metres. At the end of it, there’s a 3 metre-high and 18 metre-wide mound in which many fine pieces of burned small clay plaster were found. At the eastern foot of the hill fort and covering an area of 2 hectares there is a former settlement. In 1961, the hill fort was examined by the Lithuanian Institute of History, but hasn’t been explored more widely.

Legend has it that the Swedes poured the hill fort with their hats. Some variations of similar stories, however, mention the period of Napoleon’s reign. Another legend is about two brothers who found treasure here, but who argued who should get the horses to take the treasure. One brother said angrily: To hell with them, and the whole chest went down the Nevėžis river together with all the treasure.

On this hill fort, as well as on many other hill forts in Kaunas district, which are 23, Baltic, Christian and national celebrations are commemorated every year.

From the Piepaliai Hill Fort, towards the maintenance of which the local community contributes greatly, the view of the Nevėžis, sung about by the poets, opens up. From here you’ll also see the settlement of Babtai, mentioned for the first time at the end of the 14th century and the first monument to commemorate the pilots Steponas Darius and Stasys Girėnas. The monument, dedicated to commemorating the aviators’ flight across the Atlantic, was unveiled on October 1, 1933. The monument, containing a cross and Vytis (Lithuania’s Coat of Arms), an armour-clad knight on horseback holding a sword and shield, was demolished in 1965. The monument was rebuilt and unveiled on July 16, 1989.

Also in Babtai there are the wooden Church of Sts. Peter and Paul (built in 1853), an oak sculpture of a book smuggler (unveiled on May 7, 1999), the graves of the victims of the Holocaust (Babtai Forest) and a series of shrines designed by Algimantas Sakalauskas to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the parish, the 600th anniversary of the town and Lithuanian exiles.

Piepaliai Hill Fort

Piepaliai village, Babtai, Kaunas district

The Piepaliai Hill Fort is on the cape of the upper terrace of the right bank of the Nevėžis river. You’ll find this hill fort, which is also known as Babtynas, Babcinas and Žemaitkiemis, on your way to the Babtynas-Žemaitkiemis Manor, famous for its cultural events and located northeast of Piepaliai village.

The hill fort dates back to the period from the 1st millennium to the beginning of the 2nd millennium and is classified as an Iron Age monument. In 1880, the hill fort was mentioned in the Dictionary of Geography, published in Warsaw.

Climb 15 metres to the top of the small hill fort and you’ll find a triangular platform with a length of 17 metres and a width of 24 metres. At the end of it, there’s a 3 metre-high and 18 metre-wide mound in which many fine pieces of burned small clay plaster were found. At the eastern foot of the hill fort and covering an area of 2 hectares there is a former settlement. In 1961, the hill fort was examined by the Lithuanian Institute of History, but hasn’t been explored more widely.

Legend has it that the Swedes poured the hill fort with their hats. Some variations of similar stories, however, mention the period of Napoleon’s reign. Another legend is about two brothers who found treasure here, but who argued who should get the horses to take the treasure. One brother said angrily: To hell with them, and the whole chest went down the Nevėžis river together with all the treasure.

On this hill fort, as well as on many other hill forts in Kaunas district, which are 23, Baltic, Christian and national celebrations are commemorated every year.

From the Piepaliai Hill Fort, towards the maintenance of which the local community contributes greatly, the view of the Nevėžis, sung about by the poets, opens up. From here you’ll also see the settlement of Babtai, mentioned for the first time at the end of the 14th century and the first monument to commemorate the pilots Steponas Darius and Stasys Girėnas. The monument, dedicated to commemorating the aviators’ flight across the Atlantic, was unveiled on October 1, 1933. The monument, containing a cross and Vytis (Lithuania’s Coat of Arms), an armour-clad knight on horseback holding a sword and shield, was demolished in 1965. The monument was rebuilt and unveiled on July 16, 1989.

Also in Babtai there are the wooden Church of Sts. Peter and Paul (built in 1853), an oak sculpture of a book smuggler (unveiled on May 7, 1999), the graves of the victims of the Holocaust (Babtai Forest) and a series of shrines designed by Algimantas Sakalauskas to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the parish, the 600th anniversary of the town and Lithuanian exiles.

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